More women than you think may be living with postpartum depression.1

Not an actual patient.

Not an actual patient.

What is postpartum depression?

The definition of postpartum depression (PPD) varies among medical organizations:

  • The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) notes that perinatal depression, also known as PPD, includes major and minor depressive episodes that occur during pregnancy or within 12 months of delivery2
  • According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), a major depressive episode or major depression can be qualified as peripartum if onset occurs during pregnancy or within 4 weeks of delivery3
  • According to the DSM-5, during the same 2 week period of depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure, other symptoms can include: insomnia or hypersomnia; psychomotor agitation or retardation; fatigue; feelings of worthlessness or excessive/inappropriate guilt; diminished ability to think or indecisiveness; or recurrent suicidal ideation with or without a specific plan or suicide attempt.3 Icon of a woman and baby
  • About 1 in 9 moms suffers from PPD.1 Icon of the words 1 in 9
  • Symptoms of PPD can have a negative impact on mothers. If left untreated, these symptoms may persist for months or up to a year.4 Icon of a person in the fetal position